At Manor College for the dialogue on “Ukraine: Education as the Battlefront of Democracy” (from left) are: Dr. Albert Kipa, Dr. Serhiy Kvit, Manor College President Jonathan Peri, Dr. Andriy V. Zagorodnyuk, Dr. Leo Rudnytzky and Alex Kuzma.

Manor College event discusses education as battlefront of democracy in Ukraine

JENKINTOWN, Pa. – Over 100 members of the Ukrainian-American community traveled from New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania to gather on April 6 at Manor College for a presentation on “Ukraine: Education as the Battlefront of Democracy.”

The dialogue examined the most crucial areas of educational reform needed in Ukraine in order to protect and preserve free and democratic ideals. Dialogue moderator Dr. Albert Kipa, former rector of the Ukrainian Free University in Munich and professor laureate of comparative literature at Muhlenberg College, opened the dialogue by sharing a few well-known quotes defining the word “education” and said, “education tries to bring the best out of … humankind.” Dr. Kipa went on to say that the purpose of this dialogue is to talk about what the United States can do to offer Ukraine greater stability. The first speaker, Dr. Serhiy Kvit, former minister of education and science of Ukraine and current director the of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy School of Journalism, focused his remarks on the reform of Ukrainian universities and colleges.

Penn State University to mark three 25th anniversaries

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – The Woskob Family Foundation, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures will be celebrating the 25th anniversary of Ukraine’s independence and 25 years of Ukrainian studies at The Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pa., on Tuesday, April 4. The event will also mark 25 years of cooperation in Forestry and Agricultural Sciences with the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences (NULES) in Kyiv. The rector and representatives of NULES will be in attendance at the daylong series of events. The schedule for the day includes the following:

• 3 p.m. – Helen Woskob’s memoirs “Freedom and Beyond: My Journey from Ukraine to a New Life in America,” as well as Prof. Michael Naydan’s novel about the city of Lviv, “Seven Signs of the Lion,” will be launched at the Hintz Alumni Center on the Penn State University Park campus.

Manor to host dialogue about education as the battlefront of democracy in Ukraine

JENKINTOWN, Pa. – On Thursday, April 6, at 2 p.m. in the Manor College auditorium, Manor College will host a dialogue on the topic “Ukraine – Education as the Battlefront of Democracy.”

This dialogue will examine the most crucial areas of educational reform needed in Ukraine in order to protect and preserve free and democratic ideals. Currently, the chief looming crises in Ukrainian education are conflicting ideals held by post-Communist era sympathizers who have failed to embrace Western philosophies, and pay-to-GPA corruption, whereby those entrusted with educating Ukraine’s students are accepting cash for grades. Is there hope for reform and increased international credibility of the Ukrainian educational system? Can the Ukrainian community and concerned Americans help Ukraine to resolve these crises?

James R. Huntwork

Arizona State University and Melikian Center emphasize language, strategic importance of Ukraine

TEMPE, Ariz. – With generous seed funding from Advisory Board Member Patience T. Huntwork and her husband, James R. Huntwork, the Melikian Center looks to add Ukrainian language courses to its Critical Languages Institute (CLI) in the summer of 2017 and seeks to raise funds to endow a Ukrainian Studies Program in perpetuity. Both Huntworks serve as lawyers, and both have been active in Ukraine. Ms. Huntwork, a graduate of Stanford University and Yale Law School, works as an attorney in the judiciary of the State of Arizona. Her volunteer human rights efforts in Ukraine began with her successful international campaign to persuade the American Bar Association to sever its ties with a Soviet organization, the Association of Soviet Lawyers, and continued with efforts to advocate for legal reform and the rule of law in a democratic and independent Ukraine.

Manor College’s new logo and tagline.

Manor College launches new brand and hears campus reactions

JENKINTOWN, Pa. – On Friday, January 27, Manor College officially launched its new brand to students, faculty, staff, friends and various members of the college community. Included in the rebrand was a polished new institutional logo, athletic logo, tagline and website. The college auditorium was teeming with school spirit and excitement as Manor College President Jonathan Peri unveiled the new brand, which took many months of preparation. The rebrand launched with a giant banner being unveiled in spotlights on the stage of the Manor College auditorium stage while six students ran out onto the stage armed with 10 T-shirts in hand and started throwing the shirts out to the crowd.

International conference to examine “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-1921: Institutions and Individuals”

NEW YORK – On February 24-25, the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute of Columbia University will convene a conference titled “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-1921: Institutions and Individuals” that will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Ukrainian Revolution and the creation of the modern Ukrainian state. The conference will focus both on the important institutions that were founded under the Ukrainian Central Rada/Ukrainian National Republic, the Ukrainian State of Hetman Pavlo Skoropadsky and the Ukrainian National Republic under the Directory, and on the individuals that formed them. These state institutions proved to be essential in organizing and giving structure to Ukrainian political, educational, cultural and religious developments at that time. The successes and failures of these initiatives provided models that were both emulated and adjusted in subsequent years and that continue to inform Ukrainian nation-building efforts today. The conference will examine the lasting impact of these individuals and institutions on Ukrainian culture and scholarship.

Columbia’s Ukrainian Studies Program offers seven courses

NEW YORK – In the spring 2017 semester, the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute of Columbia University will offer seven courses, including a new course focusing on the presence of Ukraine and Ukrainians in New York City. The program will also organize several events and will present the conference “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-1921: Institutions and Individuals” during the upcoming semester. On Wednesdays at noon-2 p.m., Prof. Alexander Motyl will teach “Ukraine in New York” – a course that offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the Ukrainian American community in New York City from its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present. The course focuses on the history, demographics, economics, politics, religion, education and culture of the community, devoting particular attention to the impact thereon of the New York setting; shifting attitudes towards American politics and culture and homeland politics and culture; and the tensions encountered in navigating between America, Soviet Ukraine and independent Ukraine. Dr. Mark Andrycyzk will teach the course “The Aura of Soviet Ukrainian Modernism” on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1:10-2:25 p.m. This course studies the renaissance in Ukrainian culture of the 1920s – a period of revolution, experimentation, vibrant expression and polemics.

Prof. Alexander Motyl

“Ukraine in New York” comes to Columbia University

NEW YORK – Columbia University’s Harriman Institute will be offering a unique course in the spring 2017 semester – “Ukraine in New York” – focusing on the history and development of the Ukrainian community in New York City. Prof. Alexander Motyl of Rutgers University will teach the course, which will be open to both graduate and undergraduate students. “Ukraine in New York” is a multidisciplinary exploration of the Ukrainian American community in New York City from its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present. The course focuses on the history, politics, culture, demographics, economics, religion and society of the community, devoting particular attention to the influence of the New York setting, the tensions encountered in navigating between America, Soviet Ukraine and independent Ukraine, the impact on community politics and culture of major crises (World War I, Ukrainian independence in 1918, the Famine of 1932-1933, World War II, Ukrainian independence in 1991, and the Euro-Maidan Revolution of 2014), identity shifts within and between immigrant waves, and self-representations. Guest lecturers will be invited to several sessions; a walking tour of the Ukrainian neighborhood in lower Manhattan, as well as conversations with community leaders, scholars, and artists will be organized.

Drs. Vassyl and Roksolana Lonchyna, committee chairs in Chicago.

Fund-raisers to support UCU conclude in the United States

LVIV – At the end of 2016, the first seven-year Comprehensive Campaign for the Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU), conducted under the theme “A New Generation for a New Ukraine” will come to a close. Towards this goal, five cities in America held fund-raisers in support of UCU this fall: Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago and New York. In the spring, a fund-raiser was held in northern New Jersey. Thanks to the generous support of benefactors and sponsors, more than $750,000 was raised for UCU at these events. The Comprehensive Campaign in support of UCU began in 2010.

The conference audience listens to Lesley Cormack, dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta.

Ukrainian studies reviewed at CIUS’s milestone 40th anniversary conference

EDMONTON, Alberta – “A jewel in the Faculty of Arts” – this is how Lesley Cormack, dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta, described the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) on the opening morning of the conference “Ukrainian Studies in Canada: Texts and Contexts,” held in Edmonton on October 14-15. Over the course of two days, 30 scholars and community figures from across Canada and abroad reviewed the history of the institute and the development of Ukrainian studies as an interdisciplinary field. In five roundtable sessions, they discussed the challenges and opportunities confronted by scholars in Ukrainian studies due to the changing intellectual landscape of the humanities, the corporatization of universities and fiscal constraints. The conference at the U of A’s Lister Center was attended on average by 125 people each day. About 600 others viewed the presentations live online from Canada and other countries  – the United States, Poland, Ukraine, Germany and others.