Collaboration in the suppression of the Ukrainian famine

(The Ukrainian Weekly, December 27, 1987, No. 52, Vol. LV)

The paper below was delivered by Dr. James Mace at a conference on “Recognition and Denial of Genocide and Mass Killing in the 20th Century” held in New York on November 13. PART I
In 1932 and 1933 an artificially created famine made the Ukrainian SSR, the contiguous and largely Ukrainian North Caucasus Territory to its east, and the largely German and Tatar regions of the Volga Basin, in the words of Robert Conquest, “like one vast Belsen. A quarter of the rural population, men, women and children, lay dead or dying, the rest in various stages of debilitation with no strength to bury their families or neighbors. At the same time (as at Belsen), well-fed squads of police or party officials supervised the victims.”

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part XII

(The Ukrainian Weekly, July 5, 1987, No. 27, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Philadelphia regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on June 5. Margarita Borzakivska, Philadelphia:

…In 1929 the forced collectivization of agriculture began in the villages of Podillia, where I lived and studied to be a designer of ceramics and glass. Almost 800 people studied in the institute which I attended in the town of Kamianets-Podilsky.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part XI

(The Ukrainian Weekly, June 28, 1987, No. 26, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Philadelphia regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on June 5. Larysa Donchuk, Philadelphia:

I was born in the region of Poltava on September 18, 1908, and was 24 years old when the famine began in 1932. As the daughter of a Ukrainian Orthodox priest, I belonged to what the Soviet state called the “foreign class element.”

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part X

(The Ukrainian Weekly, June 7, 1987, No. 23, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Phoenix, Ariz., regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on February 13. Ivan M., Tucson, Ariz.:

…From 1929 to 1933, I worked at a cement factory in a suburb of the city of Kharkiv, called Nova Bavaria. In 1932, I had my first glimpse of the famine.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part IX

(The Ukrainian Weekly, May 31, 1987, No. 22, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Phoenix, Ariz., regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on February 13. William I. Krewsun, San Diego, Calif.:

I was born in small hamlet of Sai, Lypova-Dolyna district, Poltava region in 1922. I was about 10 and a half years old when this catastrophe happened.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part VIII

(The Ukrainian Weekly, May 24, 1987, No. 21, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the San Francisco regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on February 10. Mykola Kostyrko, Sacramento:

…When the famine started – that is, when they took away all the meager reserves from the Ukrainian peasants, whoever had some clothing or other articles came to the city, to the market, to sell it and buy bread. But bread was sold by ration cards.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part VI

(The Ukrainian Weekly, February 22, 1987, No. 8, Vol. LV)

Following is testimony of eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Warren, Mich., regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on November 24, 1986. Michael Smyk, Detroit:

In 1931, sensing that our lives were in jeopardy, all of us – my father, mother, sister, brother and myself – abandoned our house and everything in it and fled from our native village. I settled in Dniprodzerzhynske, formerly Kamianske, while my father and the rest of the family went to the iron ore basin of Kryvorizhzhia.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part V

(The Ukrainian Weekly, February 1, 1987, No. 5, Vol. LV)

Following is testimony of eyewitnesses to the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Warren, Mich., regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on November 24, 1986. The Rev. Alexander Bykovets, Detroit:

As a boy of 8 or 9, I remember well the autumn of 1932 and the winter and spring of 1933 in the city of Poltava where my father was a parish priest of the Resurrection Cathedral of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church. There was a grave shortage of food.

For the record: eyewitness testimony before Commission on Famine. Part IV

(The Ukrainian Weekly, January 4, 1987, No. 1, Vol. LV)

Following are excerpts of testimony by eyewitnesses of the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Ukraine who appeared at the Chicago regional hearing of the U.S. Commission on the Ukraine Famine on November 7. Stephen C., Chicago:

I was born in the village of Sari, near the city of Hadiach in the Poltava region. I was born on the 13th of August in 1923, the son of a poor peasant.