Disputing allegations made by previous letter writers

Dear Editor:

I believe that as a responsible, independent newspaper you have an obligation to demand from the writers to your editorial board factual information. Unfortunately, on at least two occasions, in letters to your editorial board, Mr. Mirchuk (January 17) and Mr. Martyniuk (January 29) made unsubstantiated, provocative allegations against our president, Joe Biden. They claimed that he blocked Ukraine’s military response to the Russian annexation of Crimea.

A correction regarding the Battle of Kruty

Dear Editor:

The commentary about the Heavenly Hundred (page 7) in the February 21 issue [“The heavenly hundred – the spirit that continues to motivate and drive”] contains the statement “The Youth Battle in Kruty in 1929 saw 300 students die …”

Solicit community input before suspending The Way

Dear Editor:

In its January 30 statement, printed by The Weekly (February 12), the Chancery Office of the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Philadelphia announced that The Way will suspend publication as an online biweekly newspaper, in part because “surveys [conducted as part of the Chancery Office’s reevaluation of all existing communications operations] have indicated that a vast majority of Ukrainian Catholics within the Archeparchy do not access or utilize The Way in its present format and dissemination approach.”

Ukraine’s military capabilities and Ukrainian American politics

Dear Editor:

It is one thing to state a fact, such as that former President Barack Obama agreed to provide Ukraine with non-lethal military aid but not lethal aid, or to state an opinion, such as that this decision about lethal aid was a mistake, a criticism I share. It is quite another to spout nonsense about why Ukraine didn’t respond militarily upon Russia’s occupation of Crimea, as Messrs. Mirchuk and Martyniuk have done in The Weekly.

Will Russia be permitted to complete the NordStream 2?

Dear Editor:

Maria Proskurenko’s February 4 letter to the editor commenting on Jaroslaw Martyniuk’s January 29 letter entirely missed the point that Mr. Martyniuk was making. The thrust of his letter was whether President Joe Biden would be able to prevent the fourth betrayal of Ukraine by exerting all possible pressure on Germany to stop NordStream 2. She ignored this most salient issue. Instead, she obfuscated by resurrecting defunct topics about Paul Manafort, Marie Yovanovich and President Donald Trump’s calls with Vladimir Putin, Sergei Lavrov and Volodymyr Zelenskyy, which had nothing to do with the critical point Mr. Marty­niuk raised. Ms. Proskurenko frantically attempted to deflect from Mr. Martyniuk’s assertions that Western powers have collectively betrayed Ukraine on the “big” issues, i.e., Budapest Memoran­dum, delivery of lethal weapons, and Crimea.

More betrayals of Ukraine should be noted

Dear Editor:

Jaroslaw Martyniuk listed three, potentially four, Western betrayals of Ukraine. He went on to explain that by Western, he really meant President Barrack Obama’s, now Joe Biden’s betrayal of Ukraine.

Ukraine faces a fourth betrayal

Dear Editor:
I applaud Ihor Mirchuk’s insightful letter in the January 17 issue of The Ukrainian Weekly. Mr. Mirchuk pointed to three moments in recent history where Western powers betrayed Ukraine: (1) when Presi­dent Barack Obama’s emissaries, John Kerry and Joe Biden, dismissed the guarantees in the Budapest Memorandum, (2) when Mr. Obama refused to deliver lethal weapons to Ukraine and (3) when he [Mr. Obama] blocked Ukraine’s military from reacting to the Russian occupation of Crimea.

A time for Democrats to examine their political consciences

Dear Editor:
In his latest column, “The 2020 Election and Its Aftermath,” published in the January 22 issue of The Ukrainian Weekly, Andrew Fedynsky draws a comparison between Donald Trump’s alleged attempt to overturn the U.S. election results on January 6 and Lenin’s dissolution of the Russian Constituent Assembly in January 1918.

Ukraine needs U.S. supply of COVID-19 vaccine

Dear Editor:

All of us have been through some anxious times in the last year or so. COVID-19 has been a major cause of our worries. For those of us fortunate enough to live in the United States, that concern will diminish as the various vaccines become available and their distribution becomes more efficient. This is not the case for our families and friends in Ukraine. You may be aware that Ukraine had been negotiating with Pfizer and other Western suppliers when an executive order by the now former administration stopped all vaccine exports.

Historic details are stubborn

Dear Editor:

With the U.S. presidential campaign behind us, it’s important for history’s sake that partisan mythologizing not gut sobering details of how American figures influenced tragic developments in Ukraine’s recent history. Already several times The Ukrainian Weekly’s columnists have penned paeans skirting inconvenient items related to then Vice-President Joseph Biden’s part in events affecting Ukraine. Sadly, Mr. Biden played a role in getting Ukraine to forgo armed resistance while Crimea was being invaded. The loss of Crimea – likely long-term – has been independent Ukraine’s great geopolitical tragedy (chances for eastern Donbas’s return are better).