Ukraine’s Ambassador Hennadiy Nadolenko reflects on a decade of work in Israel

After 10 years of successful work in Israel, Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of Ukraine Hennadiy Nadolenko has left Israel. The period of his work from 2010 to 2020 coincided with the terms in office of three Ukrainian presidents and numerous turbulent events in the life of both Ukraine and Israel. In October, before his flight back to Kyiv, Mr. Nadolenko gave his final interview as ambassador to Israel to Ukrainian Jewish Encounter.

Reflections on Rushnychok at 50

The members of the popular Ukrainian Canadian band Rushnychok met for the first time in 1969 at the intersection of Fairmount and Hutchison streets in Montreal. The Ukrainian National Federa­tion hall is still a stately landmark on the northeast corner. From that starting point, Rushnychok would travel to where old-world memories intersected with the demands of a new generation. It was at a time when fierce loyalties forged by the hammer of loss on the anvil of war encountered a flower-waving youth searching for love and peace. Our success would lie in appealing to both sets of travelers and dancing them across the divide.

St. John’s Preschool in Newark: A little school’s big significance

In 1988, the Rev. Bohdan Lukie, CSsR , who was pastor of St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in Newark, N.J., initiated a movement to open a community day care center.

A committee was formed that included Daria Knarvik, Linda Kleban, Marta Popovich and Terenia Rakoczy. The committee worked with Father Lukie to research the state requirements and facilitate the opening of the facility. Olga Trytjak, who was the executive education chair of the Ukrainian National Women’s League of America, joined the project with much enthusiasm. Thus, the groundwork was set.

A look at the founding of the Harvard Ukrainian Research institute

I read Thomas Prymak’s “The generation of 1919: Pritsak, Luckyj and Rudnyt­sky” (May 24) with considerable interest. I now write to make one rather important correction and to share a personal anecdote.

Whereas Dr. Prymak writes about it being the Ukrainian Canadian community that established the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, he writes that it was Prof. Omeljan Pritsak who “made a special mark by founding the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute (HURI) and its journal Harvard Ukrainian Studies (HUS)…” Perhaps because Dr. Prymak is a Canadian, he might be less informed about the history of events in the U.S. Whereas the statement about Prof. Pritsak founding the journal is certainly accurate, the statement about HURI is only half true.

A remembrance of Wolodymyra Tesluk

After living in Wiesbaden, London and Kyiv for 15 years, my husband Ihor and I moved back to Concord, Mass., to resume our life. Except that we had unalterably changed. And I was about to discover new dimensions of gratitude for reconnecting with Wolodymyra Tesluk. From the time I was about nine, she was my Ukrainian school teacher. As we lived on the same street in the south end of Hartford, Conn., she and I would march, two evenings a week, to the school about a mile away. I could hardly keep up with her brisk pace.

When I began visiting her at her home in Hartford, beginning in 2007, she was in her mid-80s. She had hardly changed, still elegant, stubbornly vigorous, bursting with ideas. As I walked into the living room, a cat lounged on the couch, a vase of red carnations and a stack of books sat on the coffee table. I would be ushered into her kitchen, where a pot of split pea soup simmered. It nourished my entire being, her no-nonsense recipe for life.

The Ukrainian Free University Foundation: 45 years of preserving Ukrainian identity

The corporate documents forming the Ukrainian Free University Foundation were filed in the State of New Jersey on October 20, 1975. The UFUF’s purposes as spelled out therein were to preserve Ukrainian consciousness and identity, cultural heritage and tradition among Ukrainian youth especially among students of higher educational institutions in the United States and abroad, to provide financial aid and moral assistance to students of Ukrainian language, history, culture, geography and other subjects on Ukraine, its past and present, and to the institutions which provide such education.

The UFUF’s initial trustees were John Marchenko, John Burtyk and Eugene Fedorenko. Its initial board of directors consisted of Alexander Nychka, Halyna Bobylak, Peter Goy, Jaroslaw Padoch and Imre Kardashinets.

Anniversaries and profiles in art and politics

Fifty years ago, a film was produced in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic titled “White Bird with a Black Insignia.” There is at least one other English translation, “White Bird Marked With Black,” which I believe misses the point that both screenwriters were making. They used the term “oznaka” in Ukrainian, which connotes designation, when they could have used “pliama” to denote a black mark if their intent was to denigrate.

The film was produced by the even then world-famous Film Studio of Oleksander Dovzhenko in Kyiv. Its screenwriters were also well-known, at least in the USSR, Yuriy Ilyenko and Ivan Mykolaichuk, the latter more so for his work as an actor in the internationally acclaimed film “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors” (1964). Ilyenko was the director of “White Bird with Black Insignia.” Additional major credits belonged to the well-known actress Larissa Kadochnykova and the cinematographer later to become world recognized, Vilen Kalyuta, who was born 90 years ago.

UAYA’s Ukraine Heritage Soccer Tour 2019

The Ukrainian Youth Association is a voluntary, non-profit youth organization that exists in Ukraine, Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Estonia, France, Great Britain, Germany and the United States. It was founded in 1917 by Mykola Pavlushkov, who was devoted to waging war against the 1917 October Russian Revolution. The Ukrainian American Youth Association (UAYA) has been a vital entity in the life of Ukrainian American communities for nearly 70 years. Among the objectives of the UAYA is to offer Ukrainian youth opportunities for social interpersonal contact and mutual support; and, to stimulate their spiritual, intellectual, social, cultural, educational and physical development. Each of the 28 branches in the United States and those in other countries, have guided Ukrainian youth toward becoming knowledgeable and active members of their Ukrainian and local communities.

The soul of the big city awakens during New York City Marathon

Every first Sunday morning in November, there is a hum in the air of the largest city in the world. It seems to be silently waiting for an important event to begin. It is the quiet before the storm, the eye of the hurricane. This event gathers tens of thousands participants from all over the world and millions of fans and spectators, including many Ukrainians. This worldwide event awakens the soul of New York City. This momentous grand event is the New York City Marathon.
The New York City Marathon is the largest running event in the world. The race course runs through all five boroughs of the city – Staten Island, Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan and the Bronx – and ends at Central Park. The total marathon distance is 26.2 miles or 42.195 km.

Hope in the “Hamerytsky Krai”

On Saturday, November 2, we attended the 125th anniversary celebration of the Ukrainian National Association (UNA) in Morristown, N.J., a wonderfully organized event that was not only a reminder of how this organization’s origins began with Lemkos, but of the importance of continuing to preserve our community’s history.
As noted in the event “playbill,” 10 brotherhoods with assets of $220 assembled in Shamokin, Pa., on February 22, 1894, to establish the Ruskyi Narodnyi Soyuz and held their first convention that May, with choirs singing the Ukrainian hymn “Shche Ne Vmerla Ukraina.” Records show that among the association’s founders were its first president, Theodore Talpash, and its second president, John Glowa, who were Lemkos from the villages of Łabowa and Zawadka Rymanowska, respectively. Dmytro Kapitula, a Lemko from the village of Świątkowa Wielka, served as president when the organization, increasingly identifying as Ukrainian, changed its name to the Ukrainian National Association in 1914.